Wednesday 3rd October 2012 – Subjects for the evening with Mark Allen


 

Hi folks,

On Wednesday 3rd October I will be covering two subjects –

1. Preparing images for an audio visual (or slide show). Shirley has kindly volunteered to bring along 100 photos, from which I will reduce down to 40 and explain why as I go.  I will then resize them, bring them into Pictures to Exe and sort the order in the Lightbox. Again I will explain why I place the images in a certain order. If I have time I will add some appropriate music and make the slide show.

2. I will also be demonstrating a program called ‘Snapseed’. http://www.snapseed.com/ check out the website!

Some background:

At our camera club on Wednesday evenings we ask members, especially beginners, to bring along up to 10 photos to be projected and discussed. We use ‘Faststone Image Viewer’ to display the photos – as this is a free product.

Discussions about the photo often relate on how the image could be improved. Within Faststone, we can make some global changes with levels, shadow and highlight adjustments etc. However; often the feedback suggests that just one part of the image should be darkened, or lightened, or have more (or less) saturation or contrast, etc. This we simply cannot do with Faststone.

In most cases we ask the author what software they are using, and then, try to quickly describe how this can be done with their software program. Everyone has their favourite software program, but once we start to dis

cuss how to do something in, say Lightroom, everyone who doesn’t have Lightroom switches off 😉 The same applies to ‘Elements’, ‘Photoshop’, ‘Capture NX’ and so on.

To make a selective adjustment on just one area of the image – but not the rest – normally involves layers, masks, blending and opacity adjustments. And for many members, especially those new to digital photography (and perhaps computers), this is simply far too complicated.

The solution is called ‘Snapseed’. This software allows you to quickly and easily make local selective adjustments. It is available for Windows, Mac, iPad, iPhone and an Android version is coming soon. It’s cheap! Just £12.99 for the Windows or Mac version and just £2.99 for iPad/iPhone versions.

If you have an iPhone or iPad splash out £2.99 and have a go.  This will allow you to ask questions. If you already own Snapseed and want to learn get the most from it, then this session will be of of interest to you. Once you see just how easy it is to make local selective adjustments, and how such adjustments can really improve your photos, I think you will be hooked! I have no doubt many of you will want to buy the desktop version.

Mark Allen

almark.net@gmail.com

Wednesday 3rd October


At our camera club on Wednesday evenings we ask members, especially beginners, to bring along up to 10 photos to be projected and discussed. We use ‘Faststone Image Viewer’ to display the photos – as this is a free product.

Discussions about the photo often relate on how the image could be improved. Within Faststone, we can make some global changes with levels, shadow and highlight adjustments etc. However; often the feedback suggests that just one part of the image should be darkened, or lightened, or have more (or less) saturation. This we simply cannot do with Faststone.

In most cases we ask the author what software they are using, and then, try to quickly describe how this can be done with their software program. Everyone has their favourite software program, but once we start to discuss how to do something in, say Lightroom, everyone who doesn’t have Lightroom switches off 😉 The same applies to ‘Elements’, ‘Photoshop’, ‘Capture NX’ and so on.

To make a selective adjustment on just one area of the image – but not the rest – normally involves layers, masks, blending and opacity adjustments. And for many members, especially those new to digital photography (and perhaps computers), this is simply far too complicated.

So; next Wednesday, I will demonstrate Snapseed. This software allows you to quickly and easily make local selective adjustments. It is available for Windows, Mac, iPad, iPhone and an Android version is coming soon. And it’s cheap! Just under £13 for the Windows or Mac version. Just £2.99 for iPad/iPhone.

Once you see just how easy it is to make local selective adjustments, and how such adjustments can really improve your photos, I think you will be hooked!

http://www.snapseed.com/

Friday 21st September 2012 – “We live in a wonderful place!” – with John Miskelly


“We live in a wonderful place!”

John Miskelly left his audience in no doubt that although he had photographed breathtaking vistas from the architectural wonders of Venice to the Imperial majesty of India there was still much to marvel at on our very own doorstep. Pictures of North Antrim’s rocky splendour and the misty Mournes mingled with atmospheric dawn and dusk shots of secluded little bays and beaches in his array of landscapes which illustrated his talk to Bangor and North Down Camera Club on Friday evening.

John had already carved out two successful careers ( as an audio engineer and an accountant) when he decided that what he really wanted to do was to take photographs so he followed his heart and became a professional photographer. Initially the bulk of his work entailed weddings and commercial assignments but after a life-changing visit to Venice landscapes became the central focus of his output and he gave the members an insight into the amount of dedication required if one is to succeed, or at least fulfil ones own ambitions in this medium.

Continue reading

Friday 14th September – An evening with Billy Rily


Once the official season begins at the Bangor and North Down Camera Club premises in Ward Avenue, it can be assured that when guest speakers are invited to give presentations, the clubroom will be packed to the doors. This certainly was the case on Friday evening when Billy Rily was our presenter.

A slideshow of some of his personal and client work was shown at the early part of the evening.

Billy has been a life-long friend and colleague of our President, Gerry Coe; indeed, he worked with Gerry in Robert Anderson Photography, more recently known as Anderson McMeekin and now known as Blacksheep, at the tender age of 15 as tea-boy, ascending up the ranks to be chief photographer, before setting up a private business. He has now been in the photography business for 45 years.

He comes from the Newcastle area and having retired from full time professional photography, is now a tutor at Newry Campus SRC, teaching photography. Continue reading

Wednesday 12th September 2012 Clubnight


Well, here we are again,  into the new season of meetings of our club.

It has been pleasantly pleasing that we have had such good attendances throughout the summer season.  Wednesday evenings, in particular, were well supported with up to 36 members in the clubroom.

The summer outings were well attended also, although I was not able to attend them all.  What has amazed me is that throughout the summer we have had potential new members turning up at the clubroom, keen to join.    Maybe the notice on our website that last season’s membership had to be closed due to oversubscription had something to do with it.

Tonight we had two new potential members attend, Colin and Geoff.  Welcome.   Isn’t it amazing how many people were clamouring to find Peter Gibson and stuff a cheque into his hands to ensure a place.

Tonight was led initially by Mark with the first of his scheduled presentations on how to prepare an Audio Visual show.    His first session dealt with the sizing of files for use in the AV.   He talked about the various formats, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9 and 16:10 which was the preferred format because in the clubroom we display using an HD projector, so sizing to 1980 x 1200 shows best here and also on modern widescreen TVs.  Mark showed a Barry Beckham video which explained formats.

Mark also discussed and demonstrated the optimum file size needed for AV work.  A 360kb image looked identical to a 2.5MB image on screen.  An AV made withthe former  size images puts less stress on the displaying computer.

After tea (thanks Helen for supplying the milk), I spent the rest of the evening until after 10.30pm, displaying and critiquing member’s photos.